Tag Archives: The New Yorker

A Study of the Broadway Understudy

The New Yorker provides a glimpse of the world of the Broadway Understudy: Understudies suffer the artistic frustration of not being able to make a role entirely their own, even should they have the opportunity to perform. They bear the difficult knowledge that their own opportunity for success depends upon the chance of someone else’s misfortune; possibly, they even wish for it. “I secretly wanted ...

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Why We (Mostly) Stopped Messing With Shakespeare’s Language

Shakespeare

The New Yorker:  Last week, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival announced that it had commissioned thirty-six playwrights to translate all of Shakespeare’s plays into modern English. The backlash began immediately, with O.S.F. devotees posting their laments on the festival’s Facebook page. “What a revolting development!” “Is there really a need to translate English into Brain Dead American?” Critics of the project may have forgotten the long ...

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