Profiles

Lee Melville

The Los Angeles Theatre scene is vast and at times disparate, there has been one voice which tried to bind the scene over the last four decades. That voice was Lee Melville. A writer, critic, director, actor, he lived and breathed theatre or his entire adult life. His presence is noted and his wisdom will be missed.

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Matthew McCray

Matthew McCray is from a small conservative mountain town in Colorado but you would never-ever-ever guess that.  He sports stylish Oliver Peoples glasses, drives a Hybrid and is the creative force which unearthed the Son of Semele Ensemble.  “When we started SOSE in 2000 we weren’t aware of many companies in LA making an adventurous style of theatre, though I now know they were out ...

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Andrew Carlberg

Andrew Carlberg, Andrew Carlberg, Andrew Carlberg.  Remember this name.  One more time — Andrew Carlberg. At 28 years old, Carlberg has produced more theatre, film, television and charity events than anyone I know his age.  “I work 24 hours a day.  Last night, I was up until four o’clock in the morning looking over a budget for a new musical they want to do here ...

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Gates McFadden

Gates McFadden

Gates McFadden is right on time as she pulls up to the Atwater Village Theatre.  There is no designated spot listed for her, she just parks wherever.  I mean, she does run the place.  “Honey, you mind carrying this in for me?”, as she hands me a bag stuffed with scripts.  I follow her inside the bustling theatre and she keys open her office, which ...

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Confessions of a Critic: Or, a Jade in Search of Diamonds

theater masks happy sad

by Kyle Moore The funny thing is, when I became a theatre reviewer for a local paper, I couldn’t describe it as a job because I wasn’t getting paid.  Truth be told, I wasn’t even really allowed to be highly “critical,” as these reviews I was writing were supposed to be more along the lines of paid advertisements with a little feedback thrown in as ...

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Kelly Ford

theater masks happy sad

By Kyle Moore It always used to bother me to think of myself as a recovering Catholic.  And while this religion-free state of being had been going on for many years, I didn’t tell anyone because I thought somehow I had failed at the whole “God” thing.   But I really did love it when I was young.  The ritual, the costumes, the bombastic organ music ...

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THE MUSE THAT ROARED

Vince Melocchi

by Kyle Moore Vince Melocchi writes in a very organic manner, a habit which springs from his original training as an actor at Penn State.  While he swears that he’s not the stereotypical alcoholic playwright, it is true that when it came time to pound out a scene for his play “Lions” in which a character drunk-dials his ex, he did what any right-minded son ...

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The Colony Theatre

Los Angeles has hundreds of theatres that all aspire to greatness. Each filled with a collection of artists that dream of building reputations that will lead to sustainable careers. When these collected artists work together and focus their dreams to a common purpose, the theatre that houses them takes a huge step toward becoming an institution. A place where throngs gather to be entertained and ...

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Shakespeare & Company’s special training and its influence on LA Theatre

by Bonnie MacBird Picture this.  You are an actor, and you’ve always been told you “should” learn Shakespeare.   In your many years of schooling you’ve had exactly one two-week flirtation with Julius Caesar in high school.  That’s it. Shakespeare is like a code you’ve never cracked.  A jewel box unopened.   So you sign up for a Shakespeare acting class.  Perhaps, like me, you’ll choose a ...

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A Noise Within

Modern theatre is replete with description and direction. Eugene O’Neil often spends pages leading up to a moment. George Bernard Shaw so often mixed his drama with prose that many think his work is better read than performed.  Tennessee Williams, Sheppard, Beckett, all trying to assure their visions.  And yet the Father of Modern Theatre, William Shakespeare seldom gave a word of description, and rarely ...

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